How to Make a Kinder Cardigan in Woven Fabric (Unlined)

Beginner's guide to sewing with knitted fabrics

The Kinder Cardigan from my latest book Beginner’s Guide to Sewing With Knitted Fabrics is one of those patterns that seems to be endlessly versatile.  I never know when I’m designing a new pattern how versatile it might potentially be, nor do I set off on the design process with that as my driving force but some patterns just seem to evolve a life of their own. However, I had for a long while felt a gap in my wardrobe that I filled with the Kinder pattern, so maybe that’s the key to versatility!

I love creating versatile patterns as it empowers you, the lovely readers of my books, to truly create your own style. Having the flexibility to tweak the design to your own needs and explore different techniques also increases the amount you can learn from each project.

Anyway, early on in the design process I did think that this one would probably work in woven fabrics as well as the knitted fabrics I was designing it for and I was right.

I made this summery cropped Kinder from a gorgeous denim-looking silk noile that I’d had in my stash since writing Beginner’s Guide to Making Skirts and I really wanted to make a handpainted version.

So, out came my trusty fabric paints out and I merrily started to throw them around!!

beginner's guide to sewing with knitted fabrics beginner's guide to sewing with knitted fabrics

I chose gold and silver as I’d originally planned to wear this to a wedding.

beginner's guide to sewing with knitted fabrics

This woven Kinder was intended to be a lightweight summery cover-up and so I chose not to line it but to finish the insides neatly with bias binding.  I will make a lined version eventually and post a step-by-step for how to add a lining. In the meantime, here are the changes I made to the Kinder construction in order to bind all the seams:

  1. join the 2 neckband pieces at the CB neck as in the original instructions
  2. before you fold the neckband in half to join the ends, press the seam allowance of one of the long edges towards the wrong side
  3. fold the neckband along the length to join the ends as in the original instructions but make sure when folding that the long edge without the pressed under seam allowance extends beyond the folded edge by 1cm
  4. make the sleeve bands and join the shoulders as in the original instructions
  5. press the shoulder seams open and attach bias binding to all 4 seam allowances
  6. insert the sleeves as in the original instructions, then bind the armhole seam allowances together (not separately like the shoulders)
  7. join the side and underarm seams as in the original instructions
  8. press the seams open and attach bias binding to all 4 seam allowances
  9. attach bias binding to the right side of the hem ready to turn when the hem is stitched
  10. attach the long edge of the neckband without the pressed under seam allowance as in the original instructions (make sure you only attach this single layer – the original instructions tell you to attach both sides of the neckband together)
  11. bring the loose edge of the neckband (with the pressed under seam allowance) down to cover the seam, tack in place close to the pressed edge and topstitch along the neckband side of the seam from the right side using your tacking as a guide
  12. attach the sleeve bands in the same way as the neckband for a neat finish
  13. hem as in the original instructions.

A final note – as the seam allowances are only 1cm (3/8″) make sure you choose a suitably narrow binding, try and find one narrower than 20mm (which would be 10mm once folded, the same width as your seam allowance, making this width tricky to apply).

Sadly, I didn’t get to wear this Kinder to the wedding as planned as it’s been too scorchio here in the UK! I just wore this loose, comfortable dress that I adapted from the shift dress in my first book Beginner’s Guide to Dressmaking.  I’ll write a post on how to do that easy adaptation soon.

summer wedding outfits

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